Contact Us

  • StickyJ Medical ID
  • (727) 823-9500
  • StickyJ Medical ID 10801 Endeavour Way #B Seminole, FL 33777

About us

StickyJ Medical ID and sister company Thoughtful Impressions have been family owned and operated for more than 21 years. The company is led by CEO Lori Torman, who has an eye for great quality and classic styles. In the early days of medical id bracelets (we're talking 1960's), medical alert bracelets were pretty boring -- basically engraved metal tags with curb link chains. The same styles were offered for children, just smaller (no wonder kids didn't want to wear them). And, by the end of the 20th century things hadn't improved that much. Lori was among the first to recognize that medical id's could be fashion conscious, and in 2005 launched designs in leather as well as stainless, and introduced polyester kids medical id bracelets that had cute designs. The sport strap line of child medical id's she introduced nearly 20 years ago is still the most popular line of children's medical jewelry on the market today. And, we now produce more than 100 different styles of medical alert bracelets and necklaces for men and women. Our engraved bracelets are individually custom engraved by our team of master engravers, ship within three (M-F) business days from the date you order, and all products come with a 90 warranty against manufacturing defects. Please come and shop with us today. It will be our pleasure to serve you.

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The Origins of the ID Bracelet

2nd Jun 2022

B.C. – A.D. ID Bracelets forever!


Bracelets have been worn by men and women for hundreds of years but none has such an interesting history as that of the identification or ID bracelet. The first ID bracelets were worn by American servicemen during World War II as part of their uniform. They started out as bent metal bands or heavy chains with a metal plate. Either version was engraved with name, rank and serial number and was meant to identify the soldier in the event he was killed in action or otherwise incapacitated and unable to speak for himself. Some men continued wearing them when they returned home, as a show of respect for their time in the service. The bracelets were worn as jewelry throughout the ‘40s. The popularity of ID bracelets spread to the civilian world in the 1970s as Americans began wearing them engraved with the name of soldiers reported either as missing in action or as being a prisoner of war during the Korean War or Vietnam War. Once the soldier returned home, those wearing his name would mail the bracelet to him. If it was learned that the soldier had died, the bracelets were sent to the family. Men often gave their bracelets to the women in their lives, much like they would give a class ring to their steady girlfriends. It was a sign of affection and a display that indicated the couple was in a committed relationship.

While these traditions have fallen out of practice, the identification bracelet is still a very popular piece of personalized jewelry. Today, they often are used to display medical information regarding life-threatening conditions the wearer might have.